This is an Analog pH Meter Kit with industrial real-time online electrode, specially designed for Arduino controllers. It use an industry electrode and has built-in simple, convenient ,practical connection and long life (up to 1 year), which makes it very suitable for long term online monitoring. It has an LED which works as the Power Indicator, a BNC connector and PH2.0 sensor interface. To use it, just connect the pH sensor with BND connector, then plug the PH2.0 interface into the analog input port of any Arduino controller. If programmed , you will get the pH value easily.

This industrial pH electrode is made of sensitive glass membrane with low impedance. It can be used in a variety of PH measurements with fast response and excellent thermal stability. It has good reproducibility, is difficult to hydrolysis, and can eliminate basic alkali error. In 0pH to 14pH range, the output voltage is linear.The reference system which consist of the Ag/AgCl gel electrolyte salt bridge has a stable half-cell potential and excellent anti-pollution performance. The ring PTFE membrane is not easy to be clogged, so the electrode is suitable for long-term online detection.

Applications

  • Water Quality Surveillance
  • Aquaculture

Specification

  • Module Power: 5.00V
  • Module Size: 43 x 32 mm
  • Measuring Range: 0-14PH
  • Measuring Temperature: 0-60 ℃
  • Accuracy: ± 0.1pH (25 ℃)
  • Response Time: ≤ 1min
  • Industry pH Electrode with BNC Connector
  • PH2.0 Interface ( 3 foot patch )
  • Gain Adjustment Potentiometer
  • Power Indicator LED

Parts List

  • Industry pH electrode (BNC connector ) x1
  • pH sensor circuit board   x1
  • Analog cable   x1

 

What to do when my strip doesn't work

First, I am so sorry that you have to check this module, but it is not hard to make your strip work again. As your strip needs a program controlling, so one of the reason can be the code, check that if you have downloaded the code successfully. You can use the led connected with digital pin13 for the test or use the sample code BLINK.

If you can download the code well, check the power supply, it need 3.3V to 5V but no more than 6V as recommend, and the power also must be able to supply enough current for 1A/m,that means what you have bought from DFRobot is 1M and your power need to supply 1A for the strip, never forget when connect the wire ensure the voltage. If too high voltage has supplied, may good luck be with you because I used to supply more than 6V for a short while but nothing happen.

OK, no problem with the code or the power, now you need to check whether the led is broken. Unpin the signal pin with Arduino, but let the power supply connect as usual. You need to use a jumper cable to connect the Arduino pin to the second signal point in the strip which means use the jumper cable to connect the Arduino and the strip but not in the origin way for maybe the first led of your strip is broken. For this way, check the third or the fifteenth until the strip shine again.Then cut the broken led off and use the new point for signal point, this step you may need to solder the cable or use a clamp to connect the line.

 

 
/*
 This code can be a good test code for your strip
 function: leds.setPixelColor(i,y) can be used to let number i of your led turn on with color of y
 and you can draw your idea easily with this function but never forget function: led.show() 
*/
 
#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h>
 
#define PIN 6     //The signal pin connected with Arduino    
#define LED_COUNT 60 // the amount of the leds of your strip(60 LEDs per meter)
 
// Create an instance of the Adafruit_NeoPixel class called "leds".
// That'll be what we refer to from here on...
Adafruit_NeoPixel leds = Adafruit_NeoPixel(LED_COUNT, PIN, NEO_GRB + NEO_KHZ800);
 
void setup()
{
  leds.begin();  // Call this to start up the LED strip.
  clearLEDs();   // This function, defined below, turns all LEDs off...
  leds.show();   // ...but the LEDs don't actually update until you call this.
}
 
void loop()
{
    for (int i=0; i<led_count; i++)="" {="" rainbow(i);="" delay(50);="" delay="" between="" rainbow="" slides="" }="" sets="" all="" leds="" to="" off,="" but="" does="" not="" update="" the="" display;="" call="" leds.show()="" actually="" turn="" them="" off="" after="" this.="" void="" clearleds()="" for="" (int="" i="0;" i<led_count;="" leds.setpixelcolor(i,="" 0);="" prints="" a="" on="" entire="" led="" strip.="" begins="" at="" specified="" position.="" roy="" g="" biv!="" rainbow(byte="" startposition)="" need="" scale="" our="" rainbow.="" we="" want="" variety="" of="" colors,="" even="" if="" there="" are="" just="" 10="" or="" so="" pixels.="" int="" rainbowscale="192" led_count;="" next="" setup="" each="" pixel="" with="" right="" color="" 192="" total="" colors="" can="" get="" out="" rainboworder="" function.="" it'll="" return="" red-="">orange->green->...->violet for 0-191.
    leds.setPixelColor(i, rainbowOrder((rainbowScale * (i + startPosition)) % 192));
  }
  // Finally, actually turn the LEDs on:
  leds.show();
}
 
// Input a value 0 to 191 to get a color value.
// The colors are a transition red->yellow->green->aqua->blue->fuchsia->red...
//  Adapted from Wheel function in the Adafruit_NeoPixel library example sketch
uint32_t rainbowOrder(byte position) 
{
  // 6 total zones of color change:
  if (position < 31)  // Red -> Yellow (Red = FF, blue = 0, green goes 00-FF)
  {
    return leds.Color(0xFF, position * 8, 0);
  }
  else if (position < 63)  // Yellow -> Green (Green = FF, blue = 0, red goes FF->00)
  {
    position -= 31;
    return leds.Color(0xFF - position * 8, 0xFF, 0);
  }
  else if (position < 95)  // Green->Aqua (Green = FF, red = 0, blue goes 00->FF)
  {
    position -= 63;
    return leds.Color(0, 0xFF, position * 8);
  }
  else if (position < 127)  // Aqua->Blue (Blue = FF, red = 0, green goes FF->00)
  {
    position -= 95;
    return leds.Color(0, 0xFF - position * 8, 0xFF);
  }
  else if (position < 159)  // Blue->Fuchsia (Blue = FF, green = 0, red goes 00->FF)
  {
    position -= 127;
    return leds.Color(position * 8, 0, 0xFF);
  }
  else  //160 Red (Red = FF, green = 0, blue goes FF->00)
  {
    position -= 159;
    return leds.Color(0xFF, 0x00, 0xFF - position * 8);
  }
}

pH Analog Meter Pro

  • Brand: DFRobot
  • Product Code: DFR-SEN0169
  • Reward Points: 58
  • Availability: Out Of Stock
  • £70.74

  • Ex Tax: £58.95
  • Price in reward points: 600

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